Tag: color

Book: John Ruskin ‘Elements of Drawing – Letter 3’

John Ruskin (1819 – 1900) was an english art critic, draughtsman and watercolorist. My tutor suggested to look into his third letter about color. Overall I sense that Ruskin is quite strict in his rule setting and he challenges the ‘amateur’ artist strongly on what may be nearly un-reachable. Perhaps this has to be seen in the context of his…

Project 3 – Exercise 5: Still with color used to evoke mood

Continuing with my same still life scene but how being free to explore colour and colour interaction in a way that it evokes mood.  balance, serenity and calm atmospheric. My final image: Oil on unprimed canvas (40 x 60 cm) The relationship of colour and mood was articulated some centuries ago. JW Goethe explored the in his color theory the…

Project 3 – Exercise 3 – Still life: Color Accuracy

This exercise is about matching color and tonal values as close as possible. In the previous still life exercises I already practiced this and found the following approach as very helpful: Tonal value study:  in pencil / charcoal etc. for Matching tonal value:  Starting with a colour with a hue that is close to the target hue but with higher saturation as…

Gallery Visit – Ian Davenport (b. 1966) in Zurich, Switzerland

Ian Davenport – Cadence (15th April – 28th May, 6th June – 16 July, 2016) at Gallery AndresThalmann (http://www.andresthalmann.com/CMS/en-GB/Exhibitions/Ian%20Davenport%20-%20Cadence.aspx?Sel=8) Already in the context of my personal project as started during part 5 of Drawing 1 course unit, I was fascinated by the work of Ian Davenport and his ‘color obsession’ and puddle paintings of parallel color stripes in multiple variations.…

Project 3 – Research Point: Optical Effects

“Artists enhance and elaborate the effects, whereas scientists contract and constrain them.” (Nick Wade, 2003) Optical effects are based on visual perception associated to observed constraints and conventions. Pascal Mamassian (2016) explores in his article about ‘Ambiguities and conventions in the perception of visual art‘ how the human eye and mind of the observer resolves ambiguous scenes in everyday perception and comparing them…

Project 3 – Exercise 2: Successive contrast

Successive contrast means the phenomenon whereby a sensation such as lightness, colour, or warmth tends induce the opposite perception. It works best if the colour field is of high saturations and brightness and the afterimage typically let the complementary colour appear when looking at a white paper afterwards. But is also works on other coloured grounds. The following image demonstrates how the…

Project 3 – Exercise 1: Exploring Contrast

About simulataneuous and successive contrast: effect of an inducing fields onto a test patch. The higher the saturation of the test field the stronger the effect. Comparing visual colour perception of juxtaposed colours close to each other:   => Colour perception is strongly impacted by the surrounding space. Close  to each colours are muting each other. The complementary colour of…

Exhibition – Paul Signac (1863 – 1935) in Lausanne, Switzerland

Exhibition about Paul Signac ‘Une vie que fil de l’eau (A life as a son of water)’ in La Foundation de l’Hermitage, Lausanne from 29 Jan – 22 May 2016. (click here  – accessed 18 May 2016) The intention of the museum was to show with almost 140 oil paintings, watercolours and drawings the prolific career of Signac as a neo-impressionist artist…

Exhibition – David Hominal (b. 1976) in Vevey, Switzerland

Retrospective exhibition ‘David Hominal‘ in Musée Jenisch, Vevey (Switzerland) from 03 Mar – 15 May 2016.  Click here – accessed 09 May 2016). Flyer click here. David Hominal is a swiss artist from Evian, France, studied art in Lausanne, and currently with residence on Berlin is constantly searching through painting for the ‘tension of the world‘ (Menour, 2013). In his multifaceted work…

Project 1 – Exercise 4: Complementary colors

Remark: embedded photos do not show necessarily my colour perception of the originals. The idea of the exercise is to mix a complete color wheel and to see how opposite colour, called complementary colors,  do behave in juxtaposition and in mixes. Definition (Oxford Art Online): “Pairs of colours seen to be in strong contrast to one another. This is achieved through the…

Project 1 – Exercise 3: Broken or tertiary colors

Broken and tertiary colours = ‘Produced by the mixture of secondary colours, tertiary colours are often very dull and tend to be variations of greys and browns.‘ (Oxford Art Online). Tasks:  Make a scale between orange red and green blue with consistent tonal values. Mid point should be grey For this range I wanted to understand what red-orange and green-blue means regarding the…

Project 1 – Exercise 2: Primary and secondary color mixing

Before starting this exercise on my prepared middle grey supports I wanted to look up what primary and secondary colour really means: Looking up definitions in Oxford Art Online: Primary colour: ‘One of the three chromatic colours—red, yellow, and blue—from which all other colours may be mixed, with the assistance of black and white.‘ Secondary colour: ‘The three colours which are produced by mixing pairs of the…

Contextual Research: Mark Rothko – Seagram murals

To place my experiments with color washes into context I am looking the the large color field painting of Mark Rothko (1903 – 1970). The course material suggested to look at the Seagram Murals at Tate. The group of paintings were initially part of a larger commission for the Four Seasons Restaurant in the new Seagram Building in New York (designed…